Western Research Institute (WRI)

Primary tabs

This digital collection is a series of technical reports from WRI's Coal Gasification initiatives. Western Research Institute (WRI), located in Laramie, Wyoming, is a multi-million dollar, not-for-profit, research organization renowned for work in advanced energy systems, environmental technologies and highway materials research. The institute's corporate headquarters are on the University of Wyoming campus and a 22-acre Advanced Technology Center (ATC) north of Laramie that provides additional laboratories, plus pilot facilities and room for new development. WRI is a research institute with broad perspectives and know-how in science, technology and real-world, on-the-ground conditions. Their highly experienced team of men and women offer expertise from fields such as chemical, petroleum and environmental engineering, organic, physical, analytical and inorganic chemistry, geology, soil science, business administration and economics. Through our Cooperative Research Program with the Department of Energy, WRI originates technologies that attract industrial partners from corporations, industry associations, government entities, and other research organizations. WRI advances client technologies from concept to bench scale through pilot testing and commercialization. With the Federal Highway Administration, WRI conducts concentrated research that supports breakthroughs in materials knowledge, leading to safer, longer-lasting roads―experience WRI is able to bring to bear to meet client needs. WRI offers the full matrix of resources―experience, expertise, physical infrastructure and industry connections―to realize the potential of your concepts or ours. WRI extends your reach.


Pages

0014 Hoe Creek
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Original Not Release
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Oil Shale Retorting Tests
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort DPI 208, 209, 225
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Gas Processing System
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Gas Processing System Fun S78 Field Data
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Gas Processing System Fun S79 Field Data
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort ID
[IsPartOf] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Oper Manual - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Process Design - Part 1 - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Process Design - Part 2 - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Process Design - Part 3 - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Process Design - Part 4 - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Process Design - Part 5 - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Process Design - Part 6 - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10 Ton Retort Process Design - Part 7 - Map
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
103 DOE Energy - 83-87- MAR (ISSO5)
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
10th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
11th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
13C NMR Studies Of Oil Shale Evaluation And Processing
The solid state NMR techniques of cross polarization with magic angle spinning have been employed to characterize the organic carbon distribution in raw, partially and fully retorted oil shales..., [Is Part Of] Digitized Collections- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
13th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
14 Oil Shale Symposium Endings
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
14th Oil Shale Symposium Proceedings
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
15 Oil shale Symposium Endings
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
150 - Ton Retort Steam Test Thermocouple Data
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
16 Oil Shale Symposium Endings
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
16 Oil Shale Symposium Endings-1983
A comprehensive environmental baseline characterization of the Naval Oil Shale Reserves (NOSR) has been conducted since 1978 and is essentially complete, except for some long-term trend measurements that are continuing until September of 1983. The data from this study can be used in a site-specific environmental impact statement for NOSR development. The baseline study includes geology, vegetation, wildlife, aquatic resources, air quality, meteorology, cultural resources (historic, archaeological, fossil, wilderness, recreation, visual) and socioeconomics. Local subcontractors with specific expertise in the oil shale region provided assistance in field studies. Prior to starting the field work, a detailed baseline monitoring plan was prepared and coordinated with several local, state, and federal agencies for review and comment. Most recommendations made by the agencies could be incorporated into the program. There were no environmental characteristics found that would obviously preclude development on the NOSR; however, there were some findings for which mitigating measures may need to be implemented, depending upon the magnitude of development. These areas include big game migration patterns, threatened and endangered species of vegetation and fish, archaeological sites, and maintenance of air quality., [Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
17 Oil Shale Symposium Endings
The challenge facing the oil shale industry is to devise a simple and efficient retorting process that operates at low cost. This will require a thorough understanding of the important physical and chemical processes that occur during retorting, mathematical modeling to analyze the complex interactions, and sophisticated engineering to design a retorting process having the minimum cost. Retorting processes can be classified into two groups, one using hot gas as the heat transfer medium and one using hot solid material. We have constructed mathematical models of two generic processes from each of these groups to represent state-of-the-art processes as well as those under development. The models are based on detailed reaction kinetics, thermodynamics, and process physics. Using these models, we have calculated the process characteristics and the complete mass and energy balances for 50,000-barrel/day shale oil plants. We have made comparisons of these four processes to illustrate their advantages and disadvantages. The comparisons include retort vessel volume, heat exchange capacity, power requirements, water requirements, and waste gas volume. The results indicate no present easy choice of a best process. Oil shale process technology is neither highly developed nor mature, and substantial improvements can be expected from further research and development, and from industrial experience. The hot gas processes can be viewed as first-generation technology, and the hot solid processes, if they can be successfully developed, may be second-generation technology., [Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
17 Oil Shale Symposium Endings - 1984
Environmental regulation of the oil shale industry is shared in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming by EPA and the states. While much of the day-to-day administration of environmental programs is delegated by EPA to these states, Congress holds EPA accountable to carry out Congressional intent; thus EPA plans to maintain a strong presence in western oil shale environmental matters, characterized by "firmness, fairness, .... with common sense." Despite voluminous oil shale environmental studies during the past 20 years, many unknowns remain. Briefly discussed, these include air and water impacts of the large quantities of solid waste which will be produced by the industry, consumption of PSD air increments, potential for emissions trading, and acid deposition impacts on high elevation ecosystems., [Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection
1982 Heavy Oil / EOR Contractor Reports - Proceedings Presented July 27 - 29, 1982, San Francisco
Recovery of acid oil with simple alkaline agents is economically attractive. However, two major impediments must be overcome. The efficiency of tertiary recovery must be increased and the amount of alkali loss by rock reactions myst be reduced. This paper reports preliminary results of using tall-oil pitch and polymers for improving oil recovery behavior and a multivalent cation for suppressing alkaline silica dissolution. When combined with an alkaline-polymer solution, tall_oil pitch at 0.5 w/o concentration recovers around 60% of tertiary oil. Residual oil sturations down to 10% are observed. Since tall-oil pitch is a waste product from sulfite paper manufacture, it is both cheap and available. Further tall-oil pitch is quite compatible with high salinities and temperatures. Addition of alcohol to the alkali-tall oil pitch mixtures does not enhance oil recovery. Aluminium cations in concentrations as low as 10 ppm drastically slow the alkaline dissolution of crystalline and amorphous silica. The effect is mainly due to adsorption of aluminium at the silica surface. Although soluble aluminium is produced in-sity in an alkaline flood by slow dissolution of clay minerals, addition of aluminium to the flooding solution seems warranted.
1984 Wildlife Monitoring Report (September 1983 - August 1984) For The Seminoe No. 1 Mine - Hana Basic, Carbon County, Wyoming
This report describes the technical approach and results of a wildlife monitoring program conducted at the Seminoe No. I Mine for Arch Mineral Corporation (Arch) by western Resource Development Corporation (WRD) of Boulder, Colorado. The report is based on monthly field surveys by Arch personnel from September 1983 through March 1984, and by WRD personnel from April 1984 through August 1984. The purpose of the annual wildlife monitoring program is to fulfill a commitment contained in the Wyoming State Program Permit Application for the Seminoe No. I Mine (Arch 1979) and to satisfy applicable guidelines of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) and Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD). The compliance monitoring program is intended to document long-term patterns of wildlife occurrence, abundance, and habitat use in conjunction with mining and reclamation activities in the permit area. The program emphasized big game, game birds, and raptors, but other species observed during the surveys also were recorded. The annual monitoring period covered by this report was from September 1983 through August 1984. Additional information on the wildlife resources of the Seminoe No. I Mine study area is provided in the Wildlife Baseline Study (Arch 1979) and Annual Wildlife Monitoring Reports (Arch 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983). The baseline and previous monitoring reports are included in Appendix 0-9 of the Wyoming State Program document for the Seminoe No. I Mine. Additional copies of this report are provided to the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD), the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS)., http://www-lib.uwyo.edu/showcase/emag/1984WildLife/
1986 Annual Summary Of Coal Gasification And Liquification - Volume XI
[Is Part Of] Digitized Collection- Western Research Institute, Coal Gasification Collection

Pages